Gay leaders in the world’s most anti-gay countries write letter to Obama

By Junior Mayema,

I think the best option for those activists living in their most antigay countries of the world is to pressure their americans LGBT and straight ally  counterparts and stake holders organizations in the USA like Human Rights Campaign   to  continue to urge the the Obama Administration to appoint a special envoy for the human rights of LGBT people within the State Department to stand as a statement of the U.S. commitment to the human rights of LGBT people worldwide. i don’t even know whether special envoys remains when the administration of a president is over if so THIS WILL BE THE BEST LEGACY EVER that president Obama can leave for LGBT people worldwide, because lets forget about protecting LGBT rights worldwide if the republicans take the White House in 2016 because they already took the Congress and their majority are religious extremists and antigay, bigots here is what they are doing so far :

GOP Congress defies veto threats, moves bills attacking Obamacare, forcing pipeline constructionhttp://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/01/gop_congress_defies_veto_threa.html

What does Republican Senate takeover mean for LGBT issues? – See more at: http://www.washingtonblade.com/2014/11/04/senate-republican-takeover-means-lgbt-issues/#sthash.lA56aNv8.dpuf

http://www.washingtonblade.com/2014/11/04/senate-republican-takeover-means-lgbt-issues/

this is one example about the work of the US special envoy in Sudan :

Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan

http://www.state.gov/s/sudan/

  • Pressing the Government of Sudan to stop waging war on its own people, including by ending indiscriminate bombing, denial of unfettered humanitarian access and disregard of human rights and fundamental freedoms, as well as address the legitimate political concerns of all of the country’s diverse population.
  • Working to end the crisis in South Sudan by supporting the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD)-led talks, engaging the government, opposition and representatives of South Sudanese society, and supporting efforts to ensure justice, reconciliation, and accountability;
  • Supporting the work of the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel to resolve outstanding issues related to the Comprehensive Peace Agreement between Sudan and South Sudan.
  • Helping both governments meet the needs of their people and address humanitarian crises (http://www.usaid.gov/who-we-are/organization/bureaus/bureau-democracy-conflict-and-humanitarian-assistance/office-us).

And here is how an US LGBT special envoy can work extremely hard for the protection and security of LGBT people worldwide:

http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/civil-rights/221307-special-envoy-for-gay-rights-needed

A special envoy would be especially important when the rights and lives of LGBT people are imperiled in countries allied with the United States. Too often, human rights take a backseat as the United States seeks cooperation on economic or strategic matters. For example, the U.S. coalition against ISIS includes governments, like Saudi Arabia’s, notoriously hostile to sexual minorities. Another partner, Egypt’s military government, has systematically cracked down on LGBT people, using “debauchery” and “public decency” laws to arrest dozens.

A challenge for the United States is that some foreign leaders claim that the notion of equality for LGBT people is an insidious import from the west. The special envoy—preferably someone with diplomatic experience—would cultivate partnerships with frontline LGBT activists, who can help shape U.S policy and ensure that it aligns with their needs. The goal is to provide help that actually helps. To that same end, the Special Envoy could build partnerships with government leaders around the world to underscore the fact that LGBT equality is a universal value, not a form of imperialism.

It is only natural that crises, security and otherwise, should consume the lion’s share of the administration’s attention. But there should be a consistent baseline focus on LGBT rights. A special envoy would help the President realize his goal of protecting LGBT people worldwide—and help secure his legacy as the president who made a focus on the human rights of LGBT people part of U.S. foreign policy.

And here is the entire story about why gay rights activists living in most antigay countries need help from President Obama :

Gay rights leaders in the world's most anti-gay countries are calling on Obama to be more consistent.

Gay rights leaders in some of the world’s most homophobic countries have written a letter to President Obama.

They are calling on him to be more consistent with dealing with the governments that are passing anti-LGBTI laws.

The letter, signed by people like Kenya’s Eric Gitari and The Gambia’s Pasamba Jow, suggest the way he dealt with Ugandan politicians should be the same as the way he deals with lawmakers from countries that do not receive the same media attention such as Nigeria or Kyrgyzstan.

‘Some clear response is needed. How can we trust otherwise that the United States will, indeed, stand with us as we fight for our rights?’ they write.

‘Mr. President, we ask that the United States make clear, even now, that steps will be taken to respond, without fail, in any country where governments attack us and deny our rights.

‘We believe that such a policy, clearly enunciated and triggered when dangerous new laws or discriminatory national programs are enacted and purposefully deployed against us, would deter the leaders of our countries from pursuing shameful national agendas that seek to deny the rights of our LGBT brothers and sisters.’

Read the full letter below:

Dear Mr. President:
We are not citizens of your country. We write to you, with respect, because we appreciate your unprecedented public support for the fundamental human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals globally, and because we know that your country’s actions carry great consequence in today’s world.

You have promised that the United States will stand with LGBT people in seeking fairness and equality in all of our countries. Many of us can speak to the positive efforts of U.S. embassies in our countries that have given local impact to that promise.

But if the promise of equal and fair treatment is to be realized, United States policy must be consistent and clear. We ask that it be made so. When Uganda passed a new law threatening the safety, rights and well-being of its LGBT citizens, the U.S. responded clearly. We believe the steps that you took – to deny visas to those responsible for that law, examine how the law might impact U.S. programs, and ensure that no area of your country’s bilateral relationship was immune to a suitable response – have had a positive impact on Uganda’s actions.

But no such actions have been taken toward Nigeria, where a similar law was also recently adopted and is now in effect. No action has been taken toward Brunei, or The Gambia, or Kyrgyzstan, or India, which have all recently increased or re-introduced harsh criminal penalties against LGBT citizens. Not that the response to those counties needs to be identical to the steps taken in Uganda, but surely some clear response is needed. How can we trust otherwise that the United States will, indeed, stand with us as we fight for our rights?

Mr. President, we ask that the United States make clear, even now, that steps will be taken to respond, without fail, in any country where governments attack us and deny our rights. We believe that such a policy, clearly enunciated and triggered when dangerous new laws or discriminatory national programs are enacted and purposefully deployed against us, would deter the leaders of our countries from pursuing shameful national agendas that seek to deny the rights of our LGBT brothers and sisters.

We ask that you stand with us in this struggle, not only for our sake, but also for yours. The better world we seek, and that we believe in, will benefit all of us through increased democracy, security and prosperity, and that vision cannot be achieved without a consistent partnership with the United States. Your leadership now will be viewed by history as an enduring legacy of your Administration.

– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/gay-leaders-worlds-most-anti-gay-countries-write-letter-obama080115#sthash.DcQC3WMi.iztSR7uG.dpuf

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