LGBTQ Activism Continues for Bias Protections and Overlooked Trans Issues and Houston senator asks DOJ to protect rights of gay Texans

By Junior Mayema,

Gay marriage is not the end of the battle, it is just the beginning of a new battle against religious extremist people, racist people, sexist people, transphobic people, xenophobic people etc…. this artice below explain more about it  :

LGBTQ Activism Continues for Bias Protections and Overlooked Trans Issues

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/31632-lgbtq-activism-continues-for-bias-protections-and-overlooked-trans-issues

After the Supreme Court’s historic ruling on marriage equality, many LGBTQ leaders are now redirecting their attention to obtaining federal, state and local legal protections in areas of employment, housing and commerce. Nationwide, anti-discrimination laws for gay people are inconsistent and unequal with only 22 states barring discrimination based on sexual orientation. The Human Rights Campaign is now advocating for a broad federal shield that would protect people of all sexual orientations and gender identities under the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Meanwhile, grassroots LGBTQ activists are calling for large, national organizations to also focus their attention and resources on other pressing issues, including lesbian and gay refugees and asylum seekers, the plight of homeless youth ostracized by their families, and the disproportionately high levels of violence experienced by transgender people. We are joined by Jennicet Gutiérrez, an undocumented trans activist from Mexico who recently made national headlines when she interrupted President Obama to say “No more deportations!” at a White House event. Gutiérrez is a founding member of Familia: TQLM, established to advocate for LGBTQimmigrants often excluded in the immigration debate. We are also joined by Marc Solomon, national campaign director of Freedom to Marry and author of “Winning Marriage: The Inside Story of How Same-Sex Couples Took on the Politicians and Pundits – and Won.”

TRANSCRIPT:

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: As the Supreme Court delivered an historic ruling on marriage equality Friday, we turn to the future of the LGBTQ movement. Many gay rights leaders are now redirecting their attention to obtaining federal, state and local legal protections in areas of employment, housing and commerce. Nationwide, anti-discrimination laws for gay people are inconsistent and unequal with only 22 states barring discrimination based on sexual orientation. The Human Rights Campaign is now advocating for a broad federal shield that would protect people of all sexual orientations and gender identities under the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Meanwhile, grassroots LGBTQ activists are calling for large, national organizations to also focus their attention and resources on other pressing issues, including lesbian and gay refugees and asylum seekers, the plight of homeless youth ostracized by their families, and the disproportionately high levels of violence experienced by transgender people. During the first two months of this year, transgender women of color were murdered at a rate of almost one per week in the United States. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, transgender women of color are among the groups most victimized by hate violence in the country.

For more, we go to Los Angeles, California, where we’re joined by Jennicet Gutiérrez, an undocumented trans activist from Mexico. Last week, she made national headlines when she interrupted President Obama at the White House to say, “No more deportation!” Gutiérrez was a founding member of Familia: TQLM, established to advocate for LGBTQ immigrants often excluded in the immigration debate. And we’re here in New York with Marc Solomon still, national campaign director of Freedom to Marry.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Jennicet, your reaction to the Supreme Court’s ruling on Friday?

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: Good morning, and thank you for having me again. I do believe the US Supreme Court made the right decision, and this is a huge victory for the LGBT community and for justice in this country. However, you know, many people in the LGBTQ, especially people of color, marriage is not a priority. So we’re facing many challenges.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk about those challenges and what you think needs to be the focus of LGBTQ activism today?

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: Yes. Well, personally, as an undocumented trans woman of color, and, you know, my community is facing a lot of incarceration, police brutality and deportation. So I do believe that we are at a point where we have to – you know, the mainstream LGBT community can come and get behind the transgender community and include all the voices and listen to the struggles that we are facing. And hopefully we can move in the right direction and make progress for all of us.

AMY GOODMAN: Marc Solomon, you’re the national campaign director of Freedom to Marry. What happens with this organization now?

MARC SOLOMON: So, our organization, as we have always promised, will shut down in the next few months. But the fight for equality for LGBT people must continue. And there are some crucial items on the agenda that – I believe we can harness all of the momentum and all of the conversations and all of the goodwill that’s come out of this marriage ruling to make steady and actually rapid progress.

AMY GOODMAN: Your book is called Winning Marriage: The Inside Story of How Same-Sex Couples Took on the Politicians and Pundits – and Won. Do you have any strategy suggestions for all that you have won, for all you’ve learned in this victory, for how people organize effectively?

MARC SOLOMON: Absolutely. I think – I mean, I have a number of them. And of course people can look at the book if they want the full picture. But I think a couple are having a powerful vision of what you want to accomplish, which I think motivated so many people in our community and so many of our allies to get motivated, and then it’s, you know, really looking strategically at the map and where we can put wins on the board and build momentum every single day towards that, towards that end.

AMY GOODMAN: Jennicet Gutiérrez, if you could talk specifically about the experience of immigrants, you, yourself, an undocumented trans activist from Mexico? I mean, it’s quite astounding. I want to go back to that moment. You know, we had you on when you interrupted President Obama Wednesday as he spoke to a gathering celebrating LGBT Pride Month at the White House. You got in. This is what happened.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I want to thank all of you – advocates, organizers, friends, families – for being here today. And over the years, we’ve gathered to celebrate Pride Month, and I’ve told you that I’m so hopeful about what we can accomplish. I’ve told you that the civil rights of LGBT Americans –

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: President Obama –

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Yeah, hold on a second.

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: Release all LGBTQ detention centers! President Obama, stop the torture and abuse of trans women in detention centers! President Obama, I am a trans woman. I’m tired of the abuse. I’m tired of [inaudible] –

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Listen, you’re in my house. … As a general rule, I am just fine with a few hecklers, but not when I’m up in the house.

AMY GOODMAN: That was President Obama and Jennicet Gutiérrez last Wednesday at the White House. If you had the microphone for longer, Jennicet, if you could talk about the plight of undocumented trans immigrants – a six-month Fusion investigation found some 75 transgender detainees are detained by immigration authorities every day?

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: Yes, that is correct. And I have been involved, especially in the last two months, with this community, in particular, that has been affected. And I have spoken to specifically two transgender women from Guatemala who came to the US in hope of a better treatment and a better future. And they turned themselves in to the immigration officials, and only to be put into these detention centers. So they shared their horrific stories, the abuse, the torture, that they’re being – going through in these facilities. And, you know, the abuse that they’re facing is like sexual abuse. They’re being harassed. When they need to take showers, the officials say, like, “Turn around. Let me see your breasts.” And they want to touch them. And other people detained, they’re sexually abusing them. So, to me, that was very heartbreaking to hear. And I connected with her – you know, with that, because I am an undocumented woman, and I am potentially at risk to be put in one of these detention centers. So it is very important for the mainstream LGBT community to listen to these struggles and to unite and do something that will benefit us all and move us in the right direction.

AMY GOODMAN: And the issue of housing?

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: Yes, housing is a huge issue that we face, as well. And, you know, I have known people, transgender people, who I’ve been coming in contact to through the last year or so, and they have employment, and they transition during the work, and they – once they transition, they get fired, because they don’t support it, and then they have to be demoted with the risk of losing housing. So that is another very critical issue that we have to come together and face this and get behind our community and, you know, do see something productive and positive in the struggles that we’re facing.

AMY GOODMAN: US Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning has a new piece in The Guardian. It’s called “Same-sex marriage isn’t equality for all LGBT people. Our movement can’t end,” she wrote. In it, Chelsea Manning writes, “I worry that, with full marriage equality, much of the queer community will be left wondering how else to engage with a society that still wants to define who we are – and who in our community will be left to push for full equality for all transgender and queer people, now that this one fight has been won. I fear that our precious movements for social justice and all the remarkable advancements we have made are now vulnerable to being taken over by monied people and institutions, and that those of us for whom same-sex marriage rights brings no equality will be slowly erased from our movement and our history.” She wrote this in prison. Chelsea Manning, of course, is the whistleblower who was an Iraq intelligence officer, released documents to WikiLeaks revealing US killings in Iraq, and has been sentenced to decades in prison. As you hear Chelsea’s words, Marc Solomon, your response?

MARC SOLOMON: I am much more positive or much more optimistic than that. I think that with this tremendous win nationwide for equality and dignity for so many people, I believe that Americans now see a much more multidimensional aspect of who our entire community is, and I think that they are – I mean, they are fully behind protections on employment, on housing, on public accommodations. And I think, you know, we also now have a huge amount of power, that we’ve harnessed through the marriage conversation, with all of these companies that are behind us, you know, and I think we just need to take that power and move it and drive it towards nondiscrimination protections. And I think we can – we can do it. I think we can do it with a Republican Congress. I think we can do it in red states. We just need to move, you know, forward.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, here in New York City, the Stonewall Inn, the site of the uprising that helped launch the modern LGBT movement, has been granted landmark status by a city commission. The Stonewall uprising began the morning of June 28th, 1969, when members of the gay community decided to fight back against yet another New York City police raid on a Greenwich Village gay bar. Stacy Lentz, co-owner of the Stonewall Inn, praised its new landmark status.

STACY LENTZ: On that particular night, they had enough. They were fed up. And it was the first time that people from LBGT backgrounds actually stood up and kind of said, “We’re queer, we’re here, get used to it,” shut the police outside and started throwing pennies and that thing. They call it a riot, but it was pretty peaceful, for the most part, you know, a few cars overturned and those kind of things and throwing things. But for the most part, though, people gathered for three days after that. And the next year, there was actually the first LBGT pride parade.

AMY GOODMAN: Jennicet Gutiérrez, it was trans activists the led that uprising, is that right? Sylvia Rivera.

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: Yes, that is correct. And that is something that we must not forget. You know, transgender women of color were at the frontlines of this current LGBTQ movement, and we need to give them credit. And we also need to be listening to the concerns that these people were bringing up to the community and that were still trying to be ignored. So now I think we are at a critical moment where our mainstream LGBTQ community can reach out to organizations who have been advocating for transgender people, and to start providing funds and to start opening up resources so that more members of our community do see the benefit and are treated with respect and dignity.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Cathy Marino-Thomas of Marriage Equality USA.

CATHY MARINOTHOMAS: No, no, no. You know, we’re not fully equal. We have still some of our brothers and sisters that suffer. Our transgender brothers and sisters have virtually no legal protection. We have over 5,000 LGBT homeless youth in Manhattan alone every night. We have to fix those problems. We have to be able to move freely around the world as equal and supported citizens. But this is a significant step. For today, we enjoy the win.

AMY GOODMAN: Cathy Marino-Thomas of Marriage Equality USA. As we wrap up, final comments, Jennicet?

JENNICET GUTIÉRREZ: I just want to say, you know, my mainstream community, it was heartbreaking, and it really – I felt betrayed when they turned their back on me. So I believe now they are in a position to do the right thing and to reach out to us and to include us in the conversation and listen to our struggles.

AMY GOODMAN: Jennicet Gutiérrez, I want to thank you for being back with us, undocumented trans activist from Mexico, founding member of Familia: TQLM, established to advocate for LGBTQ immigrants often excluded in the immigration debate. And again, thank you to Marc Solomon, national campaign director of Freedom to Marry, the author of Winning Marriage: The Inside Story of How Same-Sex Couples Took on the Politicians and Pundits – and Won. Marc just wrote an article for the New York Daily News headlined “A field guide to making history,” and we’ll link to it at democracynow.org.

When we come back, speaking of making history, Bree Newsome scales the flagpole in Columbia, South Carolina, on the Capitol grounds and takes down the Confederate battle flag. Stay with us.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

The battle continue in the USA where are still using their deep held religious extremist belief to violate the constitutional rights of LGBT people check it out down here :

Houston senator asks DOJ to protect rights of gay Texans

http://www.chron.com/news/politics/texas/article/Texas-gay-community-on-civil-rights-What-s-next-6355717.php

AUSTIN – A state senator from Houston has asked the U.S. Department of Justice ensure same-sex couples in Texas have the right to marry, after the state’s attorney general told county clerks they could disregard the Supreme Court’s recent ruling legalizing gay marriage nationwide.

Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, on Monday sent a letterto U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch asking the department to “monitor the implementation of Obergefell and intervene, if necessary, to ensure that Texas officials do not flout the Supreme Court’s ruling and blatantly discriminate against same sex couples.”

READ ELLIS’ LETTER HERE

On Sunday evening,  first-term Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton issued an opinion that told county clerks they could refuse to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples if they believed their religion prohibited them from doing so. The opinion, which is not legally binding, said clerks should expect to encounter possible litigation and fines, and added that Paxton would “do everything I can from this office” to help them.

In his letter, Ellis blasted Paxton for the guidance and said “religion must not be relied upon as an excuse to discriminate and refuse to fulfill the duties of government taxpayer-funded jobs.”

“Where does this end?” he asks. “Will judges be able to argue that they should not have to recognize or authorize divorces if it offends their religious sensibilities? Could a judge refuse to sentence a defendant to the death penalty under his or her belief that ‘thou shalt not kill’ means just that?”

Earlier Monday, gay rights activists gathered on the steps of the state Capitol also reacted to Paxton’s attempts to subvert the  Supreme Court’s ruling, calling him irresponsible and reminding supporters their fight for equal rights was far from over.

“The theatrics of Texas Attorney General Paxton, who has blatantly encouraged state officials to defy the highest court in the land, is evidence of that very fact,” said Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin.

He added, “Over the course of this country’s great history, there have been elected officials who have found themselves on the wrong side of history when iust comes to implementing historic decisions. And I suspect, in this case, history will not be kind to the attorney general of this state.”

Many members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender, or LGBT, community spent the weekend celebrating the landmark ruling at various PRIDE events around the county. In Texas, one of the 13 states with a ban on same-sex marriage still in place before the ruling, gay couples began getting licenses at a handful of clerks offices almost immediately Friday.

Many more clerks waited for guidance Paxton had promised.

Rebecca Robertson, legal director of the Texas chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, said at the press conference Monday that many clerks woke up on Monday, read the high court’s ruling and Paxton’s opinion and decided to follow the former. Additional clerks that have begun issuing licenses include those in Collin, Denton, Smith and Williamson Counties.

“We say to Attorney General Paxton – follow the law and respect everyone’s love,” said Kathy Miller, head of the left-leaning advocacy group Texas Freedom Network. “No obstruction, no excuses, no politics.”

Perhaps foreshadowing the next Supreme Court argument for their community, those gathered also called for a renewed emphasis on expanding gay rights beyond just marriage. While same-sex unions now cannot be denied nationwide, Texas is one of many states where individuals can be denied employment and housing based on sexual orientation.

“A couple who gets married at 10 a.m. could be fired from their jobs at noon and evicted from their homes by 2, all in the same day, simply for posting that photo on Facebook,” said Griffin. “The time has come in this country for comprehensive federal non-discrimination protections.”

Even though the majority of American now are not upset if their children are gays conversion therapy, homelessness of LGBT youth and bullying in schools is remain rife in most of part of the USA  here is a Pew about support for LGBT children by parents  :

Most Americans now say learning their child is gay wouldn’t upset them

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/06/29/most-americans-now-say-learning-their-child-is-gay-wouldnt-upset-them/

Most Americans now say learning their child is gay wouldn’t upset them

The Supreme Court decision last week legalizing gay marriage nationwide came with growing public support over the past decade. But the support for gays and lesbians to wed legally is a reminder of how Americans’ acceptance of homosexuality has also grown dramatically.

Changing Reactions to a Gay ChildThree decades ago, most Americans felt it would be troubling to have a child tell them he or she was gay: In a 1985 Los Angeles Times survey, nine-in-ten American adults (89%) said they would be upset if this happened, and just 9% said they would not be.

But views of homosexuality have shifted over time, and today nearly six-in-ten (57%) say they would not be upset if they had a child come out as gay or lesbian, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in May.

The change in attitudes toward having a gay child reflects broader shifts in views of homosexuality. More than six-in-ten Americans (63%) now say homosexuality should be accepted by society, compared with 46% in July 1994, according to the same May poll. In 1994, 49% of the public said society should discourage homosexuality.

Millennials are the least likely to say they would be upset (29%) if their child told them he or she was gay or lesbian. But the older the respondents, the more likely they are to say the moment would be a difficult one: 36% of Gen Xers say they would be upset, as would 47% of Boomers and 55% of Silents.

The question on learning a child is gay or lesbian is largely hypothetical (it was asked of adults with children and without), and this is especially true for Millennials. The oldest Millennial today is 34 years old, and our 2013 survey of LGBT Americans found that the median age for coming out to a family member or close friend was 20.

An important milestone for many gay men and lesbians is telling their parents about their sexual orientation, our 2013 survey showed. Overall, gay adults are more likely to have shared this information with their mothers (70% in the case of gay men, 67% in the case of lesbians) than with their fathers (53% gay men, 45% lesbians).

Coming Out to Parents Difficult for Gay Men and LesbiansThe majority of gay adults who did end up telling their parents said it was hard to do. Among those who told their mothers, 64% of gay men and 65% of lesbians said it was difficult; and among those who told their fathers, 74% of gay men and 63% of lesbians said it was difficult.

LGBT respondents who said in our 2013 survey that they had not told their parents about their sexual orientation or gender identity were asked in an open-ended question, “Why not?” Two main reasons emerged: 1) Some felt it was not important to tell their parent, or the subject never came up; and 2) some assumed their parent would not be accepting or understanding of this, or they worried about how it would affect their relationship with their parent.

Most gay men and lesbians who told their parents about their sexual orientation, however, said their relationship with that parent either grew stronger afterward or stayed the same, while very few said their relationship weakened.

Read more about LGBT Americans’ coming out experience, in their own words.

As people march for Pride, here are 6 things LGBT activists are still fighting for

http://metro.co.uk/2015/06/27/as-people-march-for-pride-here-are-6-things-lgbt-activists-are-still-fighting-for-5269130/

Same-sex marriage may have become legal last year, but there is still a long way to go for LGBT people.

1. Homophobic crimes have actually gone up in the past year

According to figures released last November by the police, the number of homophobic crimes had gone up by over 20 percent from 2013 in Greater Manchester, South Wales and others. Homophobic crimes have also been increasing every year since 2006 in Northern Ireland. In London alone, 1,073 homophobic attacks were reported between last January and October.

2. So have transphobic crimes

In December, the Metropolitan Police released figures showing that transphobic hate crimes had gone up by 44 percent between 2013 and 2014. Ten other police forces reported a rise in hate crimes against trans people, and it is thought that the real figures could be much higher as most of the crimes aren’t reported.

3. A quarter of homeless youth are LGBT

A survey published in February by the Albert Kennedy Trust showed that LGBT young people are more likely to end up living on the street than their straight peers. 69 percent of them became homeless after their families forced them out because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity, and 62 percent said they had experienced aggression or even physical violence in their homes.

4. LGBT refugees and asylum seekers are reportedly being sent back to countries where they are in danger

Many LGBT people have moved to England to escape from their home countries, as their sexuality and/or gender put them in danger. The UK has reportedly sent many of them back, refusing asylum for reasons that apparently include not knowing their partner’s date of birth, or having previously had children.

5. LGBT asylum seekers are reportedly being physically and emotionally abused in Yarl’s Wood detention centre 

Yarl’s Wood is an ‘immigration removal centre’, where asylum seekers are detained until their asylum claim has been assessed – most of them women. There has now been multiple reports of LGBT asylum seekers being abused and harassed by staff and fellow detainees.

6. LGBT people are more at risk of mental health issues, and less likely to get adequate treatment

Cambridge University surveyed over 27,000 LGBT people between 2009 and 2010, and found that 12 percent of lesbian women and 11 percent of gay men suffer from mental health problems. Bisexuals are especially badly hit, with 15 percent of men and 19 percent of women having reported mental health issues. These figures are two to three times higher than for straight people. LGBT respondents were also twice as likely to have had a bad experience with a GP.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s